Best Tennis Racquet

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Tennis racquet technology has advanced a long way from the times of stars like Jack Kramer and Stan Smith. Wooden racquets have since been replaced by graphite and other composites offering tremendous power without sacrificing much control. Today's racquets also offer a wide range of playing capabilities, benefiting beginning players, juniors, seniors, individuals who favor a baseline game, a net game, you name it. If you're looking for a new tennis racquet, check out our lists of best tennis racquets in the specific area you're looking for. Also, take the time to read our tennis racquet buyer's guide for a detailed look at the trade-offs involved in choosing a racquet best for you.

Best Tennis Racquet for Control:

There's an old adage in tennis that a racket can't offer both power and control because the more power, the less control, and vice versa. However I believe it is wrong as rackets can offer power and control simultaneously. Let's consider what we mean by power and control to make things explicit before we move on to the five best rackets for control.

Power is the concept of how fast you can make the ball move in response to your swing. Control is less clear and it'd be easy to say that it's a property of a racket that directs the ball. But, there's often a difference between where you THINK the racket is pointing at impact and where it’s actually pointing at impact.

So where does the notion of power vs. control come from? It likely arose early in tennis, with wooden rackets, and gut or nylon strings. Those rackets were very flexible compared to today's frames. To get power you had to swing really fast or “hard”. But, the faster you swing, the more challenging it is to maintain good form. You don't stay on the ball, your head pops up, your weight doesn't flow through the swing. The result is less control. It works in reverse too. You can hit easy soft floaters to specific spots, but they don't have much velocity or "power".

Power and control are related, but not necessarily inversely. It all depends on your swing speed, and your level of skill. If you’re a very skilled player you can get tremendous precision/control with great power from some of the stiffest frames in the game. If you are a beginner, you're likely to have a more challenging time because your swing speed will be slower or else your form will suffer. You'll get more control and a better trade-off from a flexible racket.

If you're confused, it's okay. Ultimately, you have to get the racket in your hands and try it. Your brain is the ultimate arbiter of whether or not you are getting the control you want with the power you need.

The rackets on this list offer the opportunity for precision placement and torsional rigidity, with significant plow through for players with high swing speeds and swing lengths. You'll find they generally have dense string patterns and smaller head sizes, are mainly stiff, aren't head light, and support higher string tensions.

BABOLAT AeroPro Drive GT Tennis Racquet

The Babolat Aero Pro Drive is torsionally rigid, had a good swing weight and balance, and can handle tighter tensions that offer more control. This is a great racket for players with a fast swing speed. Read Full Review

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    BABOLAT AeroPro Drive GT Tennis Racquet

    Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro Tennis Racquet

    This racket is designed to provide very good power and extremely good precision at high swing speeds. The racket performs at low tensions, but for more control it also performs extremely well at high tensions. Read Full Review

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      Head Youtek Graphene Speed Pro Tennis Racquet

      WILSON Pro Staff 90 Tennis Racquet

      The Wilson Pro Staff 90 is a demanding racket but when wielded by a superior player it rewards them with great precision. The heavy swing weight gives superior torsional stability and the racket plays well even when strung at the high end of the 48-58 pound range. Read Full Review

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        WILSON Pro Staff 90 Tennis Racquet

        Volkl Organix 10 Mid Tennis Racquet

        For better players who can hit the sweet spot consistently, the relatively smaller racket head size offers better control. It's a flexible racket but with mass to provide sufficient stability. Read Full Review

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          Volkl Organix 10 Mid Tennis Racquet

          Yonex VCore Xi 100 300G Tennis Racquet

          The VCORE Xi is a stiff racket offering good torsional stability and playability at least to 60 pounds of tension. It's light, and can play with a little adjustment by adding some extra weight to the head and still maintain control. Read Full Review

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            Yonex VCore Xi 100 300G Tennis Racquet

            Best Tennis Racquet for Power:

            There's a time in every serious tennis player's career where they’ll wants to hit the ball harder. They see openings in rallies, hit to the open court, but find they aren't hitting with enough pace. Their opponent covers the shot and the rally continues. There are at least two choices in solving the problem. The first is to take the ball earlier, reducing your opponent's time. The other option is to add velocity to your shot and for that, you may need a more powerful racket.

            The rackets on this list offer power to a variety of play levels, all the way from beginner to professional. Professionals have the skill to wield very stiff rackets and still impact tremendous spin on the ball for control. For the rest of us, the "control” portion of the equation might be more difficult to solve with these sticks.

            That said, for the player with short strokes, the older player who needs more assistance from their racket, and advanced player who wants to get more free points on serve, these rackets offer a lot of positives. They’re stiff and their balance and weight offers either power with control at high swing speeds for advanced players, or power from short, compact swings that beginners and many seniors use. They each offer large sweet spots delivering power even from off-center hits. Some are also very lightweight, making them good choices for seniors.

            BABOLAT AeroPro Drive GT Tennis Racquet

            What makes this the best tennis racquet for power is it's superb power and versatile control. It plays well with poly strings and you can lower the tension to at least somewhat relieve your arm. If you’re a big strong guy like Sam Groth, maybe you too can hit serves over 140MPH. Read Full Review

            BABOLAT AeroPro Drive GT Tennis Racquet

            VOLKL Organix 1 Tennis Racquet

            This is a very intimidating racket. If you’re looking for power this racket offers great performance, light weight, and a wide string pattern providing more control and potentially relieving some arm stress. Read Full Review

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              VOLKL Organix 1 Tennis Racquet

              Head YouTek Graphene PWR Instinct Tennis Racquet

              This is a very light racket suitable for senior players who still want to give the ball a ride. The large head size is forgiving and for those who like a head heavy feel, it's hard to imagine a stock racket that would be more suitable. Read Full Review

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                Head YouTek Graphene PWR Instinct Tennis Racquet

                Prince Premier 115 ESP Tennis Racquet

                The wide string pattern on this racquet offers control in an otherwise powerful frame. Additionally, it also features EXO technology which helps relieve stress on your arm. Read Full Review

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                  Prince Premier 115 ESP Tennis Racquet

                  Wilson 2014 Juice 100S STRUNG Tennis Racquet

                  The Wilson Juice line is a very popular power racket with many pros and competitive club players. The 100S is a very stiff head-light racket and when you start to get good compression with this racket you'll also start hearing that "pop" from the ball the pros get as it hits your racket. Just add some spin and margin for error to control your shots. Read Full Review

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                    Wilson 2014 Juice 100S STRUNG Tennis Racquet

                    Best Tennis Racquet for Tennis Elbow:

                    You don't have to be a tennis player to get tennis elbow, the common term for a specific injury to tendons in your forearm. It occurs specifically where those tendons attach to the bone on the outside of the elbow with the official medical term is lateral epicondylitis.

                    The injury can be very difficult to treat because there's not much blood flow to this part of the body and the usual treatment of resting the elbow and icing to relieve pain and swelling is often ineffective. Tennis elbow can last up to several months and when it's really bad even gripping a tennis racket can be so painful that it will keep even the most devoted tennis player off the court.
                    Fortunately, there are tennis rackets that are more "elbow friendly" and can keep you on the court if your tennis elbow isn't that severe. The following is a list of some of the top elbow-friendly tennis rackets in the game. There are three important factors that these rackets share. You'll note they’re some of the more flexible frames on the market today and are also each playable at the low end of their recommended tension range (or even below that range).

                    These racquets offer control rather than power, but anyone who's dedicated to tennis will find that playing with more control and less pain is preferable to painful power. While there are other factors to consider with tennis elbow, including the type of string used and string tension, we’ll focus on the best options for your racket.

                    Prince Tour Pro 100 Tennis Racquet

                    This is a flexible racket with a nice soft feel. Not too heavy, not too light, and with an open string pattern making it a versatile choice. Read Full Review

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                      Prince Tour Pro 100 Tennis Racquet

                      Head Graphene Prestige S

                      The racket is rated for low string tension and a fairly open string pattern. It's much more flexible than many other choices, but at the stiffer end of rackets for those who suffer from tennis elbow. Read Full Review

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                        Head Graphene Prestige S

                        Volkl Power Bridge 10 Mid Tennis Racquets

                        This is a flexible racquet that's a bit on the heavy side. Since the head size is small, you need to be comfortable with the smaller sweet spot. Read Full Review

                        Volkl Power Bridge 10 Mid Tennis Racquets

                        RZR 98M Tennis Racquet

                        This is a compromise racket in terms of head size but very head light and with a wide string pattern. The recommended string tension range is high, but the racket is playable below the range. Read Full Review

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                          RZR 98M Tennis Racquet

                          BABOLAT Pure Control 95 GT Adult Tennis Racquet

                          For players already with the popular Babolat brand, this is a reasonable choice to take some pressure off the elbow. It's a little on the heavy side and has the standard 18 x 20 string pattern. Read Full Review

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                            BABOLAT Pure Control 95 GT Adult Tennis Racquet

                            Best Senior Tennis Racquet:

                            The United States Tennis Association generally considers you to be a senior player if you're at least 50 years old and there are many tennis racquet characteristics players aged 50 to 80+ should look for. For starters, the older you get, the more likely you'll want a lighter racket since older muscles just don't carry the same strength, endurance, and ballistic acceleration they used to. Also, the older you are, the more likely your eyesight won’t be as crisp as it used to be so you can expect more off-center hits and you'll need a racquet to help you counter them.

                            If you're a competitive senior, you'll note hitting with control to a precise spot on the court and using spin to accentuate ball movement is going to be more important than just hitting it hard, so you'll want a racket that facilitates control. Additionally, recovery from injury takes longer as we age, so give a second thought to rackets that are at the extremes of being either very light or very heavy. Heavy rackets allow you to hit the ball with more power but they’re also more taxing on your arm and shoulder. Very light rackets impact the ball with less force and put more pronation stress on your arm as the racket rotates on off-center contact.

                            The rackets on this list offer benefits for seniors of all ages and you'll find racket stiffness, head size, and weight to each be important considerations. As you read, think about your style of play, your level of fitness, your level of competitiveness, and match those to the features that we’ll be highlighting.

                            Volkl Power Bridge V1 Oversize Tennis Racquet

                            This racket offers an oversize racket head, and it's weight, balance, and stiffness are suitable for players at many levels. Additionally it also features an active vibration dampening system in the grip. Read Full Review

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                              Volkl Power Bridge V1 Oversize Tennis Racquet

                              ProKennex Ki Q30 260

                              This racket from ProKennex offers the largest hitting area of any of the recommended rackets. The racket is very light, and playable even at the low end of the recommended string tension. Read Full Review

                              ProKennex Ki Q30 260

                              Dunlop Biomimetic S8.0 Lite Tennis Racquet

                              This is a very light racket with a big hitting surface. The racket is the only head heavy racket on the list and it’s playable at low tensions. Read Full Review

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                                Dunlop Biomimetic S8.0 Lite Tennis Racquet

                                Babolat 2013 Drive Max 110 Tennis Racquet

                                This is a very light racket seniors will appreciate. The racket is playable at low string tension and offers sufficient power for the senior game. Read Full Review

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                                  Babolat 2013 Drive Max 110 Tennis Racquet

                                  Wilson Juice 108 Tennis Racquet

                                  This racket plays at a comfortably low string tension, offers an oversize frame and has a moderate weight for a senior racket. Advanced players may want to add a little lead weight to the frame and gain greater plow through on their shots. Read Full Review

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                                    Wilson Juice 108 Tennis Racquet

                                    Best Budget Tennis Racquet:

                                    Looking for a new tennis racket can be confusing as there's at least 16 big-name manufacturers, each offering their own advances in racket technology. Usually, those advances come at a steep price, at least if you're buying a recent, top-of-the-line product. But where does that leave the tennis player on a budget?

                                    Here's a list of budget" racquets we recommend found for under $130. It's often the case that you get what you pay for but when buying a product from a name brand manufacturer, you're likely to at least get minimum standards that will satisfy the recreational player. Better players (for example, NTRP 4.0 or higher) might find some choices to not offer enough torsional stability, but even then there are production rackets listed below which are state-of-the-art recently, and now offered at budget prices.

                                    We assessed a minimum standard level of quality in each product listed, but we also identified the playability of each racket and whether or not it's suitable for beginners or more advanced players. Look for the trade-offs here of racket weight (some are very light), racket stiffness, and over head size.

                                    Wilson Two BLX Tennis Racquet

                                    For a racket under $100, the Two BLX offers a lot of power and playability. Players who really want a VERY light racket should try this one. Read Full Review

                                    Wilson Two BLX Tennis Racquet

                                    Wilson Triumph Tennis Racquet

                                    This is the least expensive racket on the list and any people's string jobs cost more than this model. Still, it's a Wilson and it offers a sturdy frame and a cheap alternative for the very recreational player. Read Full Review

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                                      Wilson Triumph Tennis Racquet

                                      Volkl V1 Classic Tennis Racquet

                                      This is a racket you can grow with that won't break your budget. Volkl makes high-quality products and this is a "tweener" racket that compromises well on performance and can support play levels above NTRP 4.5. Read Full Review

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                                        Volkl V1 Classic Tennis Racquet

                                        Donnay X-P Dual Tennis Racquet

                                        Advertised as Jim Courier's racket of choice, the Donnay XP Dual offers high-end performance and lower-end prices. Better players will find the racket responsive to their skill level. Read Full Review

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                                          Donnay X-P Dual Tennis Racquet

                                          Dunlop Sports Biomimetic 400 Lite Tennis Racquet

                                          The Dunlop Biomimetric 400 Lite is a well-made racket at a very reasonable price. The racket comes with Dunlop's Gecko-Tak grip which is tacky yet not sticky. The racket plays with a light weight, stiff frame, and is playable at low string tensions. Read Full Review

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                                            Dunlop Sports Biomimetic 400 Lite Tennis Racquet

                                            Best Beginner Tennis Racquet:

                                            Tennis is often described as a "sport for a lifetime," and indeed you can start playing tennis at any age and keep enjoying the sport for the rest of your life. If you're just starting to play, you'll do well to keep in mind some important facets when choosing the right racquet to make your time on the court the most fun.

                                            If you're a junior, say, aged 13 and under, it’s suggested you start your racquet search with the list of Best Junior Racquets. But if you're 14 and over, here are some of the key aspects that you'll want to consider when comparing different racquet choices.

                                            First, let's address the price. Top-of-the-line new racquets will generally cost around $150-$200 and so hesitation is understandable in buying expensive racquets right away when you're just starting to play the game. The list the follows focuses more on moderately priced racquets but includes two higher-priced selections as well in case money is no object for you.

                                            Second, let's address playability. As a beginner you'll benefit from a mid-sized (100 square inch) to oversized (110+ square inch) racquet. A larger racquet head offers a bigger sweet spot, giving you a better chance to keep rallies going while you gain necessary muscle memory.

                                            The racquet should also be fairly light at first. Spin and power come from racquet head speed, and a lighter racquet will afford you more opportunity to accelerate through the ball. As you progress, you can try heavier racquets and see if they are more to your liking.

                                            If you’re a special case, such as you're an established racquetball player or a gifted athlete coming from a non-racquet sport, you can make some adjustments by focusing on the higher performance racquets in the list. Also remember that many clubs and online stores offer nice demo programs where you can try out a racquet for a week for a very small fee.

                                            The best beginner tennis racquets on this list were chosen for being moderately priced, mid- to oversized, and lightweight, qualities which will afford most beginners a good opportunity to get started with their game.

                                            Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3 Tennis Racquet

                                            The Hyper Hammer 5.3 has a large sweet spot and very light, making it a great choice for beginners. It's also priced under $100 and it playable at a wide range of string tensions, all the way from a loose 53 to a tight 63. Read Full Review

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                                              Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3 Tennis Racquet

                                              Babolat Drive Lite Blue and White Tennis Racquet

                                              The Babolat Drive Lite gets great reviews from players of many different NTRP ratings. It's a good choice for juniors who can handle a full-length frame. The racquet can play well with low tension, which can be a plus for tennis newbies who want to alleviate stress on their arms. Read Full Review

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                                                Babolat Drive Lite Blue and White Tennis Racquet

                                                Head Youtek Graphene Instinct MP Tennis Racquet

                                                The Head Graphene Instinct is a slightly more advanced racquet but still great for beginners who are new to tennis but aren’t strangers to sports in general. It's a cost-effective choice which can be found for under $130, a great price for first-rate racquet technology. Read Full Review

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                                                  Head Youtek Graphene Instinct MP Tennis Racquet

                                                  Prince Tour Pro 100 Tennis Racquet

                                                  The Prince Tour 100 is one of Prince's top line racquets. It would play well in the hands of David Ferrer and it can play well in a total beginner too. At 100 square inches it offers enough sweet spot to keep beginners on track and it's a very soft, flexible racquet that will feel very comfortable at impact. Read Full Review

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                                                    Prince Tour Pro 100 Tennis Racquet

                                                    Volkl Super G 5 Tennis Racquet

                                                    The Volkl Super G 5 is a popular choice. As with all choices for beginner racquets, its weight allows for good power with what would otherwise be a moderate swing speed and the racquet has an ample hitting zone. The Super G 5 also offers a firm stiff feel which will be great for some beginners. This is a good consideration for players who aren’t constrained by budget. Read Full Review

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                                                      Volkl Super G 5 Tennis Racquet

                                                      Best Junior Tennis Racquet:

                                                      Since most players start as kids, it's important for them to have a racket that can help them progress steadily to the next level of play. As a junior develops more and more technique, the performance demands on the racket increase to match their technique.

                                                      Today’s focus in junior rackets is often on providing a smaller version of a pro racket. For example, you'll find rackets on the following list that are junior versions of rackets tennis pros like Roddick, Nadal, and Sharapova have used (or even still using).

                                                      These racquets can be great for accomplished juniors, but it's also important to identify rackets that allow beginning juniors and kids under 11 the opportunity to graduate to these stiffer, powerful frames. No matter where your junior player is on the talent spectrum you'll be able to find a best racket for them on this list.

                                                      The rackets on the list below were selected along the following criteria including that they are each 26-inches or shorter (classifying them as junior rackets). They’re also lightweight, under 9 ounces and on the extreme even as light as 6 ounces. These racquets also offer large head sizes of 100 square inches or more. Additionally, some offer wide string patterns, widening opportunities for juniors to put spin on their shots, while others on the list are much shorter in length for very young players.

                                                      Aeropro Drive Junior 25 Tennis Racquet

                                                      The Babolat AeroPro Drive Junior offers two lengths (26 or 25 inches) and plays a lot like its adult counterpart. The frame is stiff and powerful so juniors need to be able to have good control in their technique to get the best results with this frame. Read Full Review

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                                                        Aeropro Drive Junior 25 Tennis Racquet

                                                        Babolat Pure Drive Roddick Jr.

                                                        Accomplished juniors who can handle pace and give back even more will benefit from this very stiff and powerful frame. It's a matter of feel between the Pure Drive Roddick Jr. and the AeroPro Drive Jr., based mainly on the heavier weight of the Roddick Jr. Read Full Review

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                                                          Babolat Pure Drive Roddick Jr.

                                                          Wilson BLX Juice 26 Junior Tennis Racquet

                                                          The Wilson Juice Jr. is another good choice in terms of stiff and powerful frames for juniors. It offers a wider string pattern than some of its competitors, giving kids an opportunity to play with more spin. Read Full Review

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                                                            Wilson BLX Juice 26 Junior Tennis Racquet

                                                            HEAD YouTek Graphene Instinct Jr. Tennis Racquet

                                                            The Head Graphene Instinct Jr. is better suited for younger players who have not yet reached the advanced junior level. The frame is more forgiving than other stiffer options, light weight, and responsive. Read Full Review

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                                                              HEAD YouTek Graphene Instinct Jr. Tennis Racquet

                                                              Head Speed 25 Junior Tennis Racquet

                                                              The Head Speed 25 offers a very light racket and larger head size for junior players who haven’t yet mastered their technique. The Speed junior series of rackets is great for junior players progressing onto junior versions of other pro rackets. Read Full Review

                                                              Head Speed 25 Junior Tennis Racquet

                                                              Best Tweener Tennis Racquet:

                                                              A tweener racquet is neither too light nor heavy, with a head size not too small or too large, and a length neither too short nor too long. The strung weight is usually between 10 ounces and 11.5 ounces, the head size is between 98 square inches and 105 square inches, and the length is between 27 and 28 inches.

                                                              First, the heavier the racquet, the more mass it has at impact and so the greater force it will impart on the ball for a given swing speed, but also makes it harder to get a faster swing speed. Second, the larger the racquet head size, the larger the sweet spot but control will also be less precise. Finally, the longer the racquet the longer the lever arm you have to swing with, but you give up maneuverability on shots closer to your body.

                                                              The best tweener tennis racquets on this list each have specifications resting within the criteria mentioned above, each with their own nuances of slightly higher swing weight, more open string pattern, or a greater range of playable string tensions. Consider your own style of play and then look for the racquet that matches up well with you.

                                                              Aeropro Drive Junior 25 Tennis Racquet

                                                              The Babolat Aero Pure Drive+ offers advanced players the opportunity to play a powerful game with a tweener racquet. Its stiff frame is highly responsive for players at the NTRP 4.5 level or higher. Read Full Review

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                                                                Aeropro Drive Junior 25 Tennis Racquet

                                                                Prince Tour 100T ESP Tennis Racquet

                                                                The Prince Tour 100T ESP offers a tweener racquet with unusual frame flexibility and a very open string pattern. This gives players the opportunity for imparting greater spin and with less stress on the arm. Read Full Review

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                                                                  Prince Tour 100T ESP Tennis Racquet

                                                                  Organix V1 Midplus Tennis Racquet

                                                                  The Volkl Organix V1 Midplus is a versatile tweener. Unlike stiffer frames, this racquet can bring out the best in developing as well as advanced players. It also is playable at a wide range of string tension, which can be important for players with arm or shoulder issues. Read Full Review

                                                                  Organix V1 Midplus Tennis Racquet

                                                                  Wilson 2014 Juice 100S STRUNG Tennis Racquet

                                                                  The Wilson Juice 100S is the stiffest racquet on the list. It also has the most wide open string pattern. Some players will find it hard on their arm but string tension can be reduced at least to 53 pounds to provide an easier feel. Read Full Review

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                                                                    Wilson 2014 Juice 100S STRUNG Tennis Racquet

                                                                    Head YouTek Graphene Radical Pro Tennis Racquet

                                                                    The Head Graphene Radical Pro is a heavier racquet providing more mass to swing. It offers a nice compromise on stiffness and string tension, and is good choice for advanced players. Read Full Review

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                                                                      Head YouTek Graphene Radical Pro Tennis Racquet
                                                                       

                                                                      Tennis Racquet Buying Guide

                                                                      Tennis racquets come in various shapes, sizes, lengths, string patterns, string tension and composition to consider as well as racquet stiffness, weight, and balance. As a tennis player, you must wind your way through this maze of features to find the perfect racquet for your style of play. What works for you shouldn’t be expected to work for everyone, but here are some basic concepts to help you navigate towards an appropriate racquet.

                                                                      Shape and Size

                                                                      The hitting zone of a tennis racquet is generally oval-shaped with a “sweet spot” for response off the string bed which located near the center (a little lower if the racquet is held vertically). While there are variations in head shape between brands, it’s unclear whether they make any fundamental difference.

                                                                      What does make a difference is the racquet head size since a bigger head means a larger sweet spot. However, a larger head means less control when hitting in the sweet spot; it’s a trade-off between easily finding the sweet spot and controlling where the ball goes. Beginners should look for larger head sizes so they can quickly find the sweet spot.

                                                                      Lengths

                                                                      The longer the racquet, the longer your lever arm which allows for quicker racquet head speed and ball velocity. The standard racquet length is 27 inches but you can find extended racquets at 27.5 and 28 inches, along with shorter racquets made for juniors. A drawback of longer racquets is they’re harder to maneuver and particularly difficult to use when facing incoming balls, especially when playing at the net.

                                                                      String Patterns

                                                                      Each racquet has its own unique string pattern with more “open” patterns allowing you to lay more spin on the ball. Generally, the more space between the strings, the more spin you can generate. One common pattern is 18 main strings by 20 cross strings which provides the feel of a solid hitting bed along with other alternative pattern being 16x19 or 16x18.

                                                                      String Tension and Composition

                                                                      A racquet will play completely differently at the upper and lower ends of its recommended string tension. When strung tightly, the racquet will feel more like a board but will impart more spin and stroke control. When strung loosely, the racquet may feel more like a trampoline, generating more power but less control. Loose strings are usually in the 45-52 pound range while tight strings are 58 pounds or higher.

                                                                      Different string types require different tensions with stiff monofilament strings strung looser and softer polyfilament strings strung tighter. Natural gut strings can be strung loosely or tightly depending on your style of play. However, you’ll need to experiment to find what string tension and composition works best for you.

                                                                      Stiffness

                                                                      The stiffer the racquet, the more power it will have. Racquet stiffness is measured on a scale where mid-to-high 50s is flexible and anything over 70 is stiff. More “elbow-friendly” racquets are found with stiffness ratings of 55-60.

                                                                      Players with elbow or other arm troubles will find stiffer racquets put more pressure on joints, aggravating any existing injuries or other painful conditions. Most professional players use stiff racquets but there’s also individuals who prefer the softer feel of flexible racquets.

                                                                      Weight and Balance

                                                                      Racquet weight is a trade-off between mass and acceleration. The greater the racquet mass, the greater the force applied on the ball for acceleration. However, a racquet with greater mass will be more difficult to accelerate than a lighter model. Racquet strung weights range generally from a lightweight 9 ounces to a heavier 12 ounces.

                                                                      Racquets are also weighted to be head light, head heavy, or neutral. A head light racquet will feel more maneuverable while a head heavy racquet will feel firmer on ground strokes, making it easier to move to volleys.

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