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Cameras

Best DSLR Camera

Digital SLR cameras are an evolution of the 'single lens reflex' camera, swapping the film roll for an image sensor. These cameras offer superior performance compared to point-and-shoot models, and provide users with more control over final output. If you'd like a primer on what to look for when buying a dSLR camera, have a look at our buyer's guide.

Nikon D3300 DSLR Camera Kit w/ 18-55mm Lens

The Nikon D3300 exceeds the performance of its highly rated predecessor, the D3200, and many competitors in virtually every key category. Endowed with the same image processing circuitry as higher-priced Nikons, the D3300 produces noticeably brighter, clearer pictures than its predecessor. The Expeed 4 imaging technology also hikes the D3300’s maximum continuous shooting speed to 5 frames per second (up from 4) via faster data writes to storage.

Another major factor in the D330’s selection as the “best of the best” is battery performance. Last year’s D3200 achieved a very respectable 540 exposures per charge. With the D3300, Nikon’s upped that to an almost unbelievable 700 images, a whopping increase of 160 shots. For 2014, Nikon changed the video format of its consumer DSLRs, including the DS3300, from 30p to 60p. Probably not a big deal in making a purchase decision, but something photographers with strong feelings for or against 60p should consider.

Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital Camera Kit w/18-55mm Lens

Canon’s perennial best-selling budget-priced DSLR is a spot-on choice for photographers seeking to achieve sparkling, properly exposed, in-focus images with every shot. Using the same DIGIC 4 technology as the prosumer EOS 60da, the Rebel T5 produces pictures with a brilliant color palette, retaining fine details even in the darkest shadows and brightest highlights.

Two other features capable of turning amateur photographers into “professionals for a day” are 63-zone dual-layer exposure metering and Scene Intelligence Mode (SIM) Dual-layer metering where twin segments of the light spectrum are measured separately and compared to compensate for slight variations in color temperature and intensity. In this mode, the Rebel T5 knows everything happening in, around and in front of your camera.

SIM circuitry crunches all this intel to consider the best combination of picture perfect shutter speed, aperture, white balance, back or front light compensation, fill or full flash, and various image enhancements. The T5 offers up to 3fps continuous shooting, full HD video capture, a video snapshot mode for combining short clips into an album and in-camera video editing. It’s also fully compatible with Canon’s line of more than 60 ES and ES-F lenses.

Nikon D5300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

The Nikon D5300 is an excellent option for an all-around, general purpose DSLR. Continuing the winning formula that made its predecessor the D5200 so good, the D5300 delivers excellent photo quality, good features, and fast performance for a relatively affordable price. If you’re planning on using Nikon lenses, this is a great choice for learning on.

The D5300 retains the 24-megapixel sensor and relatively unimpressive five frames per second continuous shooting; however, this camera is excellent as long as you’re not habitually shooting fast action. Small changes have been made to the design when compared to the D5200: the camera is smaller and lighter, and with a better grip that makes it more comfortable to use over longer periods of time.

The low light autofocus is also improved over that of the D5200, while the Expeed 4 processor allows for faster processing of burst shooting and full 1080/60p video capture; the D5200 was an excellent DSLR for shooting video, and the D5300 is the same in this respect. However, the lack of both a mic and a headphone jack (the D5300 has only a mic jack) may make more serious videographers want to look elsewhere. Despite not being a revolutionary change from the previous model, the Nikon D5300 is an excellent camera, and should be a top pick for anyone seeking a camera in this class.

Sony a5100 16-50mm Mirrorless Digital Camera

While the Sony a5100 is not technically a DSLR, it is worth adding to a DSLR list due to its ability to match the performance of many DSLRs for much less money. This mirror-less camera replaces the previous NEX-5T, continuing the trend of performing like a camera much more expensive than itself. The a5100 uses a full APS-C sensor like those found in less expensive traditional DSLRs, Sony’s Bionz X processor, and a hybrid autofocus system that is fast and accurate even in low light conditions.

This camera is similar to the a6000, but without an electronic viewfinder, hotshoe, extended ISO range, and fast continuous shooting. However, the a5100 still excels in low light conditions, and offers enough advanced features to suit relatively novice shooters who are looking to step up to a camera that offers DSLR-like performance.

The camera feels good in the hands, with a rubberized grip and a more expensive-feeling texture; this is despite the camera not making much of an attempt to look like a DSLR. If you’re looking for a camera that allows you to get the most performance you can out of a limited budget, the mirror-less Sony a5100 may be a good option.

Pentax K-50 16MP Digital SLR Camera Kit

Although the Pentax K-50 is hardly revolutionary, it offers overall competitive image quality, a fully weather-sealed body, and excellent build quality and controls. This entry-level DSLR is a good camera to give a newer photographer on a budget something easy to use while leaving room to grow. While the performance of this camera doesn’t stand out as exceptional in its class, its weather-sealed body is unusual in this price range.

The K-50 uses a 16-megapixel Sony CMOS sensor, resulting in plenty of dynamic range and low noise; especially if you like to shoot in RAW, there’s a lot of performance to be extracted from this sensor. Autofocus is quick and accurate in good light, but slows down noticeably in low light conditions. Pentax has included their sensor-based shake reduction, which helps to keep images free of blur in a wide variety of conditions.

Controls all feel very good in the hand, and the grip is also excellent. Despite not being the best choice for video capture and lacking features such as an articulated LCD, the Pentax K-50 is one of the only entry-level DSLRs at this price that can be had with a fully weather-sealed body.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR Camera

The first-ever official presidential portrait using a digital camera was taken by Pete Souza, photographing Barack Obama with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II on January 13, 2009. Trivia aside, this is a showcase of just how dated the EOS 5D Mark II has become. The 5D Mark II was a hugely impressive camera well past its initial debut, but newer camera designs have been introduced to the market since then. Canon's popular full-frame dSLR has finally received the update it deserves.

Despite the continuation of the '5D' naming, the EOS 5D Mark III is essentially a new camera. The 22.3-megapixel image sensor shares more in common with the APS-C unit found in the EOS 7D than it does with the previous full-frame 21.1-megapixel sensor. Though the external body styling may look familiar to casual observers, the 5D Mark III carries more rounded corners and minor adjustments to ergonomics. The screen now features the correct 3:2 aspect ratio for shooting stills, and some of the controls have been relocated for easier access. The viewfinder offers 100 percent frame coverage, compared to 98 percent in the Mark II. Overall, the EOS 5D Mark III has been redesigned to be simpler to use without hampering access to major controls or frustrating advanced photographers.

The EOS 5D Mark III faces especially stiff challenge from Nikon's latest 36.3-megapixel D800, which threatens to siphon Canon's user base. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor allows the 5D Mark III to remain competitive, and even hold an edge in some applications. The 5D Mark III is generally fast and responsive, displaying very little lag with most functions. The AF system has received a major overhaul, with technology pulled directly from Canon's professional 1D line. When paired with a bright lens, the new 61-point AF system offers diagonal 'cross-type' focus points which deliver better accuracy. As expected, high ISO performance is best-in-class, with minimal noise in both JPEG and RAW output. While the D800 can deliver much larger prints due to its 36.3-megapixel output, the EOS 5D Mark III counters with burst shooting speeds of up to 6 fps. Both cameras deliver superb image quality, with neither besting the other outright.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly “inferior on paper” EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly 'inferior on paper' EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

Canon’s flagship APS-C DSLR fills its own little spot in the market, offering advanced photographers the speed, autofocus performance and control, and customization of a pro-level camera, while also being durable and relatively affordable for what it is. The Canon EOS 7D Mark II is geared primarily towards more advanced photographers who want a relatively affordable and compact DSLR with pro-like features and excellent build quality.

The 7D Mark II uses a 20-megapixel sensor and dual Digic 6 processors; the autofocus system features Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus built right into the image sensor. When paired with Canon’s autofocus control menu, which offers six customizable focus modes and multiple control options, it becomes evident that Canon is ahead of the competition when it comes to autofocus control at this price range.

Image quality and performance show a significant improvement over other recent cameras from Canon, with good color accuracy and auto white balance. However, this camera really shines when it comes to continuous shooting, being capable of up to ten frames per second. The 7D Mark II lacks somewhat in features for video shooters, but is capable of shooting at 1080/60p with full manual exposure and audio control; there is also both a mic and a headphone jack included as well. Overall, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II feels excellent in the hand if you already like how Canon DSLRs handle, and if currently one of the best APS-C DSLRs available.

Canon EOS-1D X Black SLR Digital Camera Body Only (18.1 MP)

Canon EOS-1D X Black SLR Digital Camera Body Only (18.1 MP)

As their flagship full-frame DSLR, the EOS-1D X delivers everything that Canon has to offer in a top-of-the-line professional camera. While most lesser cameras require you to pick between image quality or speed, the EOS-1D X offers both, along with outstanding build quality and durability. With an 18-megapixel full-frame image sensor and 61-point autofocus system, this camera delivers excellent images even at impressively high ISO settings. Meanwhile, a 14 frames per second burst shooting capability thanks in part to the power of its dual Digic 5 processors showcases the camera’s impressive speed.

Video capture maxes out at 1080/30p, and along with the lack of a headphone jack or uncompressed HDMI output, demonstrate that this camera isn’t designed to focus on the needs of videographers. While the EOS 1D-X does include an external mic input and video quality is fairly good, this isn’t this DSLR’s strong point. Dual CF card slots, extensive controls, and customization options showcase the professional nature of this high end DSLR while the battery life is quite good. The Canon EOS-1D X is a camera that’s overkill for most shooters, but for professionals such as sports shooters and journalists, it’s an outstanding tool and well worth its high price.

Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera

Canon has an APS-C DSLR to fit every budget, though the overlap between each model makes it difficult to decide which one fits which niche. The EOS 70D is technically positioned above the outstanding EOS Rebel T5i and directly below the prosumer EOS 7D; it shares many of the same features but ultimately outperforms both in the real world.

At first glance, the EOS 70D is difficult to distinguish from the the EOS 60D which it replaces. Examine the two side by side, however, and some subtle differences make themselves known. Other than the practical improvements such as a dial lock switch and a redesigned mode selector, the 70D is equipped with the same articulated touchscreen found on the Rebel T5i.

The interface is identical, providing an easy graphical alternative to the array of buttons for controlling focus modes, ISO sensitivity, etc. Performance-wise, the 70D is quick and responsive at all times. Despite the resolution increase, burst shooting speed is now a solid 7 frames per second. The 70D also receives the autofocus sensor from the 7D; combined with the new technology found in the image sensor, autofocus performance is one of the 70D's strong points.

Output quality with stills and video is excellent all around, and there are no surprises to be found anywhere (which is a good thing). The built-in WiFi feature may come across as a gimmick, but actually offers useful functionality ranging from wireless image transfers between devices, wireless printing, DLNA image streaming, and the ability to control the camera remotely.

Overall, the EOS 70D is a solid DSLR for the money, even when compared to its direct competitors within and outside of the Canon brand. Compared to Canon's other APS-C DSLR models, the newest architecture and features means we'll give our top recommendation to the EOS 70D.

Canon EOS Rebel T6i Digital SLR

Canon’s immensely popular Rebel line has successfully served the needs of entry-level DSLR buyers for years, and with its latest iteration brings some changes. Canon has opted to split the Rebel line into two different models, the EOS Rebel T6i and the EOS Rebel T6s. These two cameras are very similar to each other, both sharing the same internal components. However, the slightly more expensive T6s has been designed to appeal to a more advanced photographer.

Both cameras use an updated version of Canon’s 24-megapixel Hybrid CMOS sensor, along with a upgrade to their Digic 6 processor, allowing for all the latest features and processing power. The Rebel cameras now have an autofocus system more similar to that of the original 7D, and an updated light-metering system for better exposure.

The primary differences between the two cameras are seen in the addition of a secondary LCD screen for the T6s, a Quick Control dial around the navigation buttons, and an electronic level display. Because of this, advanced photographers will generally want to spend the little bit more for the T6s to gain the Quick Control dial.

Both cameras feature an articulating screen, as well as built-in WiFi and NFC. As to be expected, both cameras produce identical results: excellent image quality even in more challenging conditions. Overall, the T6i and T6s both offer a big update over the previous T5i although the T6i primarily makes enough ergonomic sacrifices to where it’s generally worth spending a little more on the T6s if you can.

Nikon D4S 16.2 MP CMOS FX Digital SLR

Nikon has developed a devoted following for their pro-grade DSLRs, with many professionals swearing by their cameras. This update to the excellent D4, the D4S, offers no big changes over its predecessor. While there is no urgent need to upgrade if you already have a D4, for professionals seeking a new camera, the D4S is one of the absolute best you can buy if you are looking for the fastest and highest-performing professional camera available for action photography.

The D4 was special for its ability to combine fast performance, top-notch controls and handling, and excellent video capture options. The D4S introduces improved continuous shooting with autofocus (11 frames per second for up to 20 continuous seconds), slightly better battery life, and a greater dynamic range; this camera can practically see in the dark with a top ISO of 409,600. The design is much the same as that of its predecessor, with full weather dealing, durable build quality, and an excellent grip.

The same excellent 51-point autofocus system is included, and the video capabilities now benefit from the addition of a 1080/60p mode. Video capture offers pro-level exposure and audio control, as well as an uncompressed HDMI output, and both headphone and microphone jacks. While the D4S only adds small changes over the D4, Nikon has managed to take their best camera for professional photographers and make it even better.

Nikon D7200 DX-format DSLR Body (Black)

The Nikon D7200 doesn’t introduce any revolutionary changes to its predecessor, the D7100, but the small updates help to keep it up-to-date as an excellent enthusiast DSLR on a budget. The camera is quick to turn on, and offers very good overall performance. The D7200 retains the excellent 51-point autofocus of its predecessor, the durable weather-sealed body, and a 24-megapixel APS-C sensor similar to that of the D7100.

Despite feeling almost the same in the hand as the D7100, the D7200 uses the Expeed 4 processor, and adds built-in WiFi and NFC. Also added is support for 1080/60p video capture, although this feature is limited to 10 minutes of continuous capture. Burst rate is somewhat slow for its class a six frames per second, but overall this camera is a reliable choice for an affordable enthusiast camera. Image quality is excellent, even in low light conditions as the camera demonstrates quite a wide ISO range.

The D7200 offers lots of controls and customization both front and rear, although the handling isn’t quite as ergonomic as some of Nikon’s other recent cameras. While the Nikon D7200 might not be worth it as an upgrade to the D7100, it is an excellent option for those who want the control of a DSLR and top-notch picture quality while on a budget.

D810 DSLR Camera (Body Only)

D810 DSLR Camera (Body Only)

The full-frame Nikon D800 delivered what can be described as a technological knockout, with an incredible 36-megapixel resolution and a durable weather-sealed body of outstanding build quality. Its followup, the Nikon D810, offers design and handling that is very similar, with small changes that have improved upon what was so good about its predecessor.

Like many high-end cameras, the D810 makes you choose to some degree between speedy performance and top-notch image quality; with this camera, Nikon has chosen to focus on image quality. Using the same outstanding 36-megapixel image sensor as the D800, the D810 takes things up a notch with an improved Expeed 4 processor, which has helped contribute to faster performance, improved continuous shooting, and better low light capability.

Upgrades also include 1080/60p video capture and an extended ISO range, as well as better battery life, a higher resolution rear screen, and an overall lighter and quieter design. Only small changes have been made to the controls when compared to the D800, ensuring that handling will feel familiar to anyone accustomed to Nikon layouts.

Overall, those seeking a camera specifically for video are likely better off with a different camera, but anyone who was put off by the D800’s relative slowness will be much happier with the performance of the D810. The Nikon D810 is one of the best all-around DSLRs at this price, offering some of the best image quality available and an overall excellent experience.

Nikon D5300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

The Nikon D5300 is an excellent option for an all-around, general purpose DSLR. Continuing the winning formula that made its predecessor the D5200 so good, the D5300 delivers excellent photo quality, good features, and fast performance for a relatively affordable price. If you’re planning on using Nikon lenses, this is a great choice for learning on.

The D5300 retains the 24-megapixel sensor and relatively unimpressive five frames per second continuous shooting; however, this camera is excellent as long as you’re not habitually shooting fast action. Small changes have been made to the design when compared to the D5200: the camera is smaller and lighter, and with a better grip that makes it more comfortable to use over longer periods of time.

The low light autofocus is also improved over that of the D5200, while the Expeed 4 processor allows for faster processing of burst shooting and full 1080/60p video capture; the D5200 was an excellent DSLR for shooting video, and the D5300 is the same in this respect. However, the lack of both a mic and a headphone jack (the D5300 has only a mic jack) may make more serious videographers want to look elsewhere. Despite not being a revolutionary change from the previous model, the Nikon D5300 is an excellent camera, and should be a top pick for anyone seeking a camera in this class.

Nikon D3300 DSLR Camera Kit w/ 18-55mm Lens

The Nikon D3300 exceeds the performance of its highly rated predecessor, the D3200, and many competitors in virtually every key category. Endowed with the same image processing circuitry as higher-priced Nikons, the D3300 produces noticeably brighter, clearer pictures than its predecessor. The Expeed 4 imaging technology also hikes the D3300’s maximum continuous shooting speed to 5 frames per second (up from 4) via faster data writes to storage.

Another major factor in the D330’s selection as the “best of the best” is battery performance. Last year’s D3200 achieved a very respectable 540 exposures per charge. With the D3300, Nikon’s upped that to an almost unbelievable 700 images, a whopping increase of 160 shots. For 2014, Nikon changed the video format of its consumer DSLRs, including the DS3300, from 30p to 60p. Probably not a big deal in making a purchase decision, but something photographers with strong feelings for or against 60p should consider.

Canon EOS Rebel T6i Digital SLR

Canon’s immensely popular Rebel line has successfully served the needs of entry-level DSLR buyers for years, and with its latest iteration brings some changes. Canon has opted to split the Rebel line into two different models, the EOS Rebel T6i and the EOS Rebel T6s. These two cameras are very similar to each other, both sharing the same internal components. However, the slightly more expensive T6s has been designed to appeal to a more advanced photographer.

Both cameras use an updated version of Canon’s 24-megapixel Hybrid CMOS sensor, along with a upgrade to their Digic 6 processor, allowing for all the latest features and processing power. The Rebel cameras now have an autofocus system more similar to that of the original 7D, and an updated light-metering system for better exposure.

The primary differences between the two cameras are seen in the addition of a secondary LCD screen for the T6s, a Quick Control dial around the navigation buttons, and an electronic level display. Because of this, advanced photographers will generally want to spend the little bit more for the T6s to gain the Quick Control dial.

Both cameras feature an articulating screen, as well as built-in WiFi and NFC. As to be expected, both cameras produce identical results: excellent image quality even in more challenging conditions. Overall, the T6i and T6s both offer a big update over the previous T5i although the T6i primarily makes enough ergonomic sacrifices to where it’s generally worth spending a little more on the T6s if you can.

Nikon D5300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

The Nikon D5300 is an excellent option for an all-around, general purpose DSLR. Continuing the winning formula that made its predecessor the D5200 so good, the D5300 delivers excellent photo quality, good features, and fast performance for a relatively affordable price. If you’re planning on using Nikon lenses, this is a great choice for learning on.

The D5300 retains the 24-megapixel sensor and relatively unimpressive five frames per second continuous shooting; however, this camera is excellent as long as you’re not habitually shooting fast action. Small changes have been made to the design when compared to the D5200: the camera is smaller and lighter, and with a better grip that makes it more comfortable to use over longer periods of time.

The low light autofocus is also improved over that of the D5200, while the Expeed 4 processor allows for faster processing of burst shooting and full 1080/60p video capture; the D5200 was an excellent DSLR for shooting video, and the D5300 is the same in this respect. However, the lack of both a mic and a headphone jack (the D5300 has only a mic jack) may make more serious videographers want to look elsewhere. Despite not being a revolutionary change from the previous model, the Nikon D5300 is an excellent camera, and should be a top pick for anyone seeking a camera in this class.

Canon EOS Rebel T5i 18.0 MP CMOS Digital SLR

At the top of Canon's consumer lineup sits the Canon EOS Rebel T5i, though not quite replacing the EOS Rebel T4i. The changes for this new model are fairly discrete, composing mostly of minor upgrades. These upgrades include a new kit lens with an improved autofocus motor, a new grip, premium body finish, and a new 360-degree rotation mode dial. There has also been the addition of real-time preview of Creative Filters in Live View, as opposed to having to add post-shot. This makes it easier to visualize how pictures that may work best with processing will look before taking them.

Otherwise, the Rebel T5i has the same 18-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 9-point cross-type autofocus sensor, Digic 5 image processor, and an articulated touchscreen that works especially well for video controls. It also delivers a familiar 5 fps shooting and ISO range from ISO 100 to 12,800, as well as 1080/30p video recording and stereo sound.

As cameras are increasingly being stuffed full of features, the Rebel T5i seems a bit lacking in that regard but the excellent photo and video quality remains. Overall, the Canon EOS Rebel T5i is basically the same camera as the Rebel T4i. This is both a positive and negative since the T4i is a fantastic camera, but while Canon is sticking with what's familiar, the competition is moving forward.

Nikon D3300 DSLR Camera Kit w/ 18-55mm Lens

The Nikon D3300 exceeds the performance of its highly rated predecessor, the D3200, and many competitors in virtually every key category. Endowed with the same image processing circuitry as higher-priced Nikons, the D3300 produces noticeably brighter, clearer pictures than its predecessor. The Expeed 4 imaging technology also hikes the D3300’s maximum continuous shooting speed to 5 frames per second (up from 4) via faster data writes to storage.

Another major factor in the D330’s selection as the “best of the best” is battery performance. Last year’s D3200 achieved a very respectable 540 exposures per charge. With the D3300, Nikon’s upped that to an almost unbelievable 700 images, a whopping increase of 160 shots. For 2014, Nikon changed the video format of its consumer DSLRs, including the DS3300, from 30p to 60p. Probably not a big deal in making a purchase decision, but something photographers with strong feelings for or against 60p should consider.

Nikon D5200 24.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

The D5200 is Nikon's follow-up of the D5100, which unofficially accomplished the unenviable job of replacing the D90. Sitting right between the entry-level D3200 and the enthusiast/prosumer D7100, the D5200 serves as Nikon's advanced beginner APS-C DSLR. The body itself has not been altered much, retaining the articulated LCD screen and solid-yet-lightweight feeling, although it can still sometimes seem a bit “plastic” to some. The major improvements can be seen in terms of overall performance, with this camera offering a much better shooting experience over the D5100.

With 24-megapixel resolution from the newly-developed Nikon DX-format CMOS image sensor, Nikon's new EXPEED 3 processing, and a high-density 39-point autofocus system, the D5200 offers excellent photo and video quality. It has a reasonably well-rounded feature set (such as night vision), although noticeably missing are WiFi and GPS-based geotagging. Also missing is an autofocus motor in the body, which limits lens selection somewhat. The Nikon D5200 doesn't necessarily stand out strongly from its competition in terms of specialized features or performance; however, it strikes a good balance as a general purpose camera that has no significant flaws.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR Camera

The first-ever official presidential portrait using a digital camera was taken by Pete Souza, photographing Barack Obama with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II on January 13, 2009. Trivia aside, this is a showcase of just how dated the EOS 5D Mark II has become. The 5D Mark II was a hugely impressive camera well past its initial debut, but newer camera designs have been introduced to the market since then. Canon's popular full-frame dSLR has finally received the update it deserves.

Despite the continuation of the '5D' naming, the EOS 5D Mark III is essentially a new camera. The 22.3-megapixel image sensor shares more in common with the APS-C unit found in the EOS 7D than it does with the previous full-frame 21.1-megapixel sensor. Though the external body styling may look familiar to casual observers, the 5D Mark III carries more rounded corners and minor adjustments to ergonomics. The screen now features the correct 3:2 aspect ratio for shooting stills, and some of the controls have been relocated for easier access. The viewfinder offers 100 percent frame coverage, compared to 98 percent in the Mark II. Overall, the EOS 5D Mark III has been redesigned to be simpler to use without hampering access to major controls or frustrating advanced photographers.

The EOS 5D Mark III faces especially stiff challenge from Nikon's latest 36.3-megapixel D800, which threatens to siphon Canon's user base. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor allows the 5D Mark III to remain competitive, and even hold an edge in some applications. The 5D Mark III is generally fast and responsive, displaying very little lag with most functions. The AF system has received a major overhaul, with technology pulled directly from Canon's professional 1D line. When paired with a bright lens, the new 61-point AF system offers diagonal 'cross-type' focus points which deliver better accuracy. As expected, high ISO performance is best-in-class, with minimal noise in both JPEG and RAW output. While the D800 can deliver much larger prints due to its 36.3-megapixel output, the EOS 5D Mark III counters with burst shooting speeds of up to 6 fps. Both cameras deliver superb image quality, with neither besting the other outright.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly “inferior on paper” EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly 'inferior on paper' EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

Canon’s flagship APS-C DSLR fills its own little spot in the market, offering advanced photographers the speed, autofocus performance and control, and customization of a pro-level camera, while also being durable and relatively affordable for what it is. The Canon EOS 7D Mark II is geared primarily towards more advanced photographers who want a relatively affordable and compact DSLR with pro-like features and excellent build quality.

The 7D Mark II uses a 20-megapixel sensor and dual Digic 6 processors; the autofocus system features Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus built right into the image sensor. When paired with Canon’s autofocus control menu, which offers six customizable focus modes and multiple control options, it becomes evident that Canon is ahead of the competition when it comes to autofocus control at this price range.

Image quality and performance show a significant improvement over other recent cameras from Canon, with good color accuracy and auto white balance. However, this camera really shines when it comes to continuous shooting, being capable of up to ten frames per second. The 7D Mark II lacks somewhat in features for video shooters, but is capable of shooting at 1080/60p with full manual exposure and audio control; there is also both a mic and a headphone jack included as well. Overall, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II feels excellent in the hand if you already like how Canon DSLRs handle, and if currently one of the best APS-C DSLRs available.

Canon EOS 70D 20.2 MP Digital SLR Camera

Canon has an APS-C DSLR to fit every budget, though the overlap between each model makes it difficult to decide which one fits which niche. The EOS 70D is technically positioned above the outstanding EOS Rebel T5i and directly below the prosumer EOS 7D; it shares many of the same features but ultimately outperforms both in the real world.

At first glance, the EOS 70D is difficult to distinguish from the the EOS 60D which it replaces. Examine the two side by side, however, and some subtle differences make themselves known. Other than the practical improvements such as a dial lock switch and a redesigned mode selector, the 70D is equipped with the same articulated touchscreen found on the Rebel T5i.

The interface is identical, providing an easy graphical alternative to the array of buttons for controlling focus modes, ISO sensitivity, etc. Performance-wise, the 70D is quick and responsive at all times. Despite the resolution increase, burst shooting speed is now a solid 7 frames per second. The 70D also receives the autofocus sensor from the 7D; combined with the new technology found in the image sensor, autofocus performance is one of the 70D's strong points.

Output quality with stills and video is excellent all around, and there are no surprises to be found anywhere (which is a good thing). The built-in WiFi feature may come across as a gimmick, but actually offers useful functionality ranging from wireless image transfers between devices, wireless printing, DLNA image streaming, and the ability to control the camera remotely.

Overall, the EOS 70D is a solid DSLR for the money, even when compared to its direct competitors within and outside of the Canon brand. Compared to Canon's other APS-C DSLR models, the newest architecture and features means we'll give our top recommendation to the EOS 70D.

Canon EOS Rebel T6i Digital SLR

Canon’s immensely popular Rebel line has successfully served the needs of entry-level DSLR buyers for years, and with its latest iteration brings some changes. Canon has opted to split the Rebel line into two different models, the EOS Rebel T6i and the EOS Rebel T6s. These two cameras are very similar to each other, both sharing the same internal components. However, the slightly more expensive T6s has been designed to appeal to a more advanced photographer.

Both cameras use an updated version of Canon’s 24-megapixel Hybrid CMOS sensor, along with a upgrade to their Digic 6 processor, allowing for all the latest features and processing power. The Rebel cameras now have an autofocus system more similar to that of the original 7D, and an updated light-metering system for better exposure.

The primary differences between the two cameras are seen in the addition of a secondary LCD screen for the T6s, a Quick Control dial around the navigation buttons, and an electronic level display. Because of this, advanced photographers will generally want to spend the little bit more for the T6s to gain the Quick Control dial.

Both cameras feature an articulating screen, as well as built-in WiFi and NFC. As to be expected, both cameras produce identical results: excellent image quality even in more challenging conditions. Overall, the T6i and T6s both offer a big update over the previous T5i although the T6i primarily makes enough ergonomic sacrifices to where it’s generally worth spending a little more on the T6s if you can.

Nikon D5300 24.2 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

The Nikon D5300 is an excellent option for an all-around, general purpose DSLR. Continuing the winning formula that made its predecessor the D5200 so good, the D5300 delivers excellent photo quality, good features, and fast performance for a relatively affordable price. If you’re planning on using Nikon lenses, this is a great choice for learning on.

The D5300 retains the 24-megapixel sensor and relatively unimpressive five frames per second continuous shooting; however, this camera is excellent as long as you’re not habitually shooting fast action. Small changes have been made to the design when compared to the D5200: the camera is smaller and lighter, and with a better grip that makes it more comfortable to use over longer periods of time.

The low light autofocus is also improved over that of the D5200, while the Expeed 4 processor allows for faster processing of burst shooting and full 1080/60p video capture; the D5200 was an excellent DSLR for shooting video, and the D5300 is the same in this respect. However, the lack of both a mic and a headphone jack (the D5300 has only a mic jack) may make more serious videographers want to look elsewhere. Despite not being a revolutionary change from the previous model, the Nikon D5300 is an excellent camera, and should be a top pick for anyone seeking a camera in this class.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR Camera

The first-ever official presidential portrait using a digital camera was taken by Pete Souza, photographing Barack Obama with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II on January 13, 2009. Trivia aside, this is a showcase of just how dated the EOS 5D Mark II has become. The 5D Mark II was a hugely impressive camera well past its initial debut, but newer camera designs have been introduced to the market since then. Canon's popular full-frame dSLR has finally received the update it deserves.

Despite the continuation of the '5D' naming, the EOS 5D Mark III is essentially a new camera. The 22.3-megapixel image sensor shares more in common with the APS-C unit found in the EOS 7D than it does with the previous full-frame 21.1-megapixel sensor. Though the external body styling may look familiar to casual observers, the 5D Mark III carries more rounded corners and minor adjustments to ergonomics. The screen now features the correct 3:2 aspect ratio for shooting stills, and some of the controls have been relocated for easier access. The viewfinder offers 100 percent frame coverage, compared to 98 percent in the Mark II. Overall, the EOS 5D Mark III has been redesigned to be simpler to use without hampering access to major controls or frustrating advanced photographers.

The EOS 5D Mark III faces especially stiff challenge from Nikon's latest 36.3-megapixel D800, which threatens to siphon Canon's user base. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor allows the 5D Mark III to remain competitive, and even hold an edge in some applications. The 5D Mark III is generally fast and responsive, displaying very little lag with most functions. The AF system has received a major overhaul, with technology pulled directly from Canon's professional 1D line. When paired with a bright lens, the new 61-point AF system offers diagonal 'cross-type' focus points which deliver better accuracy. As expected, high ISO performance is best-in-class, with minimal noise in both JPEG and RAW output. While the D800 can deliver much larger prints due to its 36.3-megapixel output, the EOS 5D Mark III counters with burst shooting speeds of up to 6 fps. Both cameras deliver superb image quality, with neither besting the other outright.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly “inferior on paper” EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

The EOS 5D Mark II quickly became a favorite amongst filmmakers and videographers thanks to its outstanding video capabilities. The Mark III can attribute its major improvements in video mode to the same components that deliver superior still image quality. The new image sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor work wonders with video, eliminating various artifacts and producing smooth, clean HD movies at various selectable frame rates. The mono microphone setup is still no better than other dSLRs on the market, but the 5D Mark III supports outboard microphones for higher-quality sound. As far as video goes, the EOS 5D Mark III remains the benchmark.

Ultimately, comparisons between the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Nikon D800 are unfair to both cameras. Each has its own unique user base, and cross-shopping between the brands is rare unless a photographer desires a new system. The EOS 5D Mark III may not seem like a major upgrade at first glance, since the differences are so subtle. Instead, it takes everything that made the Mark II as good as it was and takes things one or two steps further. Canon doesn't need to compete directly with Nikon - those who value snappy operation, fast shooting speeds, and top-notch still picture and video quality will find that the seemingly 'inferior on paper' EOS 5D Mark III carries its own appeal.

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

EOS 7D Mark II Black SLR Digital Camera (Body Only)

Canon’s flagship APS-C DSLR fills its own little spot in the market, offering advanced photographers the speed, autofocus performance and control, and customization of a pro-level camera, while also being durable and relatively affordable for what it is. The Canon EOS 7D Mark II is geared primarily towards more advanced photographers who want a relatively affordable and compact DSLR with pro-like features and excellent build quality.

The 7D Mark II uses a 20-megapixel sensor and dual Digic 6 processors; the autofocus system features Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus built right into the image sensor. When paired with Canon’s autofocus control menu, which offers six customizable focus modes and multiple control options, it becomes evident that Canon is ahead of the competition when it comes to autofocus control at this price range.

Image quality and performance show a significant improvement over other recent cameras from Canon, with good color accuracy and auto white balance. However, this camera really shines when it comes to continuous shooting, being capable of up to ten frames per second. The 7D Mark II lacks somewhat in features for video shooters, but is capable of shooting at 1080/60p with full manual exposure and audio control; there is also both a mic and a headphone jack included as well. Overall, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II feels excellent in the hand if you already like how Canon DSLRs handle, and if currently one of the best APS-C DSLRs available.

D810 DSLR Camera (Body Only)

D810 DSLR Camera (Body Only)

The full-frame Nikon D800 delivered what can be described as a technological knockout, with an incredible 36-megapixel resolution and a durable weather-sealed body of outstanding build quality. Its followup, the Nikon D810, offers design and handling that is very similar, with small changes that have improved upon what was so good about its predecessor.

Like many high-end cameras, the D810 makes you choose to some degree between speedy performance and top-notch image quality; with this camera, Nikon has chosen to focus on image quality. Using the same outstanding 36-megapixel image sensor as the D800, the D810 takes things up a notch with an improved Expeed 4 processor, which has helped contribute to faster performance, improved continuous shooting, and better low light capability.

Upgrades also include 1080/60p video capture and an extended ISO range, as well as better battery life, a higher resolution rear screen, and an overall lighter and quieter design. Only small changes have been made to the controls when compared to the D800, ensuring that handling will feel familiar to anyone accustomed to Nikon layouts.

Overall, those seeking a camera specifically for video are likely better off with a different camera, but anyone who was put off by the D800’s relative slowness will be much happier with the performance of the D810. The Nikon D810 is one of the best all-around DSLRs at this price, offering some of the best image quality available and an overall excellent experience.

Canon EOS Rebel T6i Digital SLR

Canon’s immensely popular Rebel line has successfully served the needs of entry-level DSLR buyers for years, and with its latest iteration brings some changes. Canon has opted to split the Rebel line into two different models, the EOS Rebel T6i and the EOS Rebel T6s. These two cameras are very similar to each other, both sharing the same internal components. However, the slightly more expensive T6s has been designed to appeal to a more advanced photographer.

Both cameras use an updated version of Canon’s 24-megapixel Hybrid CMOS sensor, along with a upgrade to their Digic 6 processor, allowing for all the latest features and processing power. The Rebel cameras now have an autofocus system more similar to that of the original 7D, and an updated light-metering system for better exposure.

The primary differences between the two cameras are seen in the addition of a secondary LCD screen for the T6s, a Quick Control dial around the navigation buttons, and an electronic level display. Because of this, advanced photographers will generally want to spend the little bit more for the T6s to gain the Quick Control dial.

Both cameras feature an articulating screen, as well as built-in WiFi and NFC. As to be expected, both cameras produce identical results: excellent image quality even in more challenging conditions. Overall, the T6i and T6s both offer a big update over the previous T5i although the T6i primarily makes enough ergonomic sacrifices to where it’s generally worth spending a little more on the T6s if you can.

Nikon D7200 DX-format DSLR Body (Black)

The Nikon D7200 doesn’t introduce any revolutionary changes to its predecessor, the D7100, but the small updates help to keep it up-to-date as an excellent enthusiast DSLR on a budget. The camera is quick to turn on, and offers very good overall performance. The D7200 retains the excellent 51-point autofocus of its predecessor, the durable weather-sealed body, and a 24-megapixel APS-C sensor similar to that of the D7100.

Despite feeling almost the same in the hand as the D7100, the D7200 uses the Expeed 4 processor, and adds built-in WiFi and NFC. Also added is support for 1080/60p video capture, although this feature is limited to 10 minutes of continuous capture. Burst rate is somewhat slow for its class a six frames per second, but overall this camera is a reliable choice for an affordable enthusiast camera. Image quality is excellent, even in low light conditions as the camera demonstrates quite a wide ISO range.

The D7200 offers lots of controls and customization both front and rear, although the handling isn’t quite as ergonomic as some of Nikon’s other recent cameras. While the Nikon D7200 might not be worth it as an upgrade to the D7100, it is an excellent option for those who want the control of a DSLR and top-notch picture quality while on a budget.

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