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Bowling

  • A night at the bowling alley is typically a pretty casual affair. You pay for the lane, find a ball and rent the garish looking bowling shoes without a second thought. For those who take the sport a lot more seriously, this list is meant for you. A good pair of shoes can have an extremely positive effect on your form and your game can greatly improve as a result.Bowling shoes are meant to protect you and the alley floor as normal shoes are too stiff for you to move correctly so when you make your approach to throw the ball, your soles could damage the floor finish. Bowling shoes are outfitted with leather or non-marking rubber soles meant to slide across the floor easily while affording you a perfect balance of support and flexibility upon release of the ball. Like all sports gear, there are brands and models best suited for various skill levels offering interchangeable soles, arch support, high-end upper materials, and pairs accommodating right or left-handed bowlers.Our list of the five best picks for men’s bowling shoes present options for every budget and ability, each one chosen on criteria including their absolute comfort, quick break-in times, inclusion of performance enhancing soles, convenient universal fitting, and of course the long-term gameplay value each shoe offers.
    August 10, 2015
  • The sport of first-dates, Homer Simpson, and weekend afternoon programming on ESPN2; bowling is suitable for everyone because anyone can play. Though maybe you're one of those folks who hears the crash of the pins like a siren's call, and it's about more than just a few beers and those cool-looking shoes. Then it's time to invest in a ball, and when you're picking out that very special one, the first thing to consider is the weight. If you go too heavy or too light, it will have an effect on your game. Go with the heaviest ball you can physically manage to wield. Anything heavier is going to be useless because you'll lack control and comfort every time you swing.You have a selection of materials to choose from in the composition of your ball; each one best suited based on your style of play, the lanes you use, and your skill level. Beginners will want to go with a plastic ball since they haven't developed their game fully and will tend to roll the ball straight, without much hook. The intermediate player might want to go with urethane, allowing for more hook on each roll; the surface will not only interact better with well-oiled lanes, but also impact the pins at a lower sweet spot. Resin balls take most of these advantages and allow for greater success with each, especially with regard to hook and strike zone. So now that you've got some buying tips to work with, take a look at our list of best picks below, each one chosen based upon the following criteria: core materials, coverstock materials, power, weight availability, and overall performance.
    April 03, 2014