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Electronic Accessories

  • When it's time to buy new batteries, there are plenty of choices out there. The way to decide which is the best option for you is to first consider what you need the batteries for, then examine what the battery is capable of doing. It all boils down to two choices; disposable or rechargeable. Simply put, disposable batteries are just that. You get a one-time use out of them and when they're drained of their power you throw them away. Rechargeables allow you to keep the cells and re-charge them repeatedly, saving time and money when it comes to the power source in your electronics. However, rechargeables aren't necessarily appropriate for every device or application. Disposable batteries are good for almost all devices, as long as you have the correct size for the application you're looking to power up. These come in two common types; alkaline and lithium. Alkaline are the most widely used as they have a slow self-discharge rate, they can be stored for a long time without any loss of charge (roughly about seven years), and these are often used in low-drain devices such as radios, remote controls, and other devices that don't require constant use at high voltage. There are high-drain versions of alkaline batteries available as well and these are intended for devices that require more juice more frequently. These 'premium' alkaline batteries cost more but provide a charge that is similar to a lithium battery. Lithium batteries last longer, can be stored longer, weigh less than a regular battery and provide nearly double or triple the power capacity of a standard alkaline battery. They also perform well in extreme temperatures. But they all have one thing in common at their very basic purpose; when they've been drained, you throw them away. Rechargeable batteries are cells that you can recharge when they're out of juice. Slip them into any charger and after a short period of time, they're fresh and ready for use all over again. They are usually more expensive than disposables, but you save money in the long run since you only buy them once. You can find them in three different types: Nickel Cadmium, Nickel Metal Hydride and Lithium-Ion (not be confused with the lithium disposables above). Depending upon which type you choose, some have low self-discharge rates, where the battery maintains its charge for an extended period of time, and others have higher rates, in which the battery does the exact opposite. No matter which type you choose, rechargeable batteries are often recommended for high-drain devices that require constant power and at large volumes. The reason is easy to understand; rechargeables can be re-charged and replaced quickly and easily and without additional costs beyond the price of electricity from an outlet. To go out and keep buying disposables for a device that needs such a power load would probably get more expensive than paying a one-time cost for a set of rechargeables and a charger.
    October 28, 2014
  • Alarm clocks now come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Some are better suited for some consumers than others. The premise is still the same, a small device that tells time and sounds an alarm at a pre-determined time and date. But nowadays you have an entire spectrum of possibilities out there when it's time to choose one for your needs. Such products these days are usually electronic and fully digital. Sure, you can still find the analog types with the round face and bells up top, but even those have some electronic component attached, such as a lit-up face. But most alarm clocks use bright, lit-up digital displays that are either LCD or LED and come with brightness dimmers. Many of these clocks have dual alarm capability, good for two-person households to set exclusive alarms with different sounds tailored to each individual. There are alarm clocks that also feature musical components to them. Clock radios have been around for decades, but with the advent of satellite radio and technologies such as iPods and MP3 players, your only option isn't just AM/FM radio anymore (though most still have it to some degree). Alarm clock docks allow you to use personal music devices to listen to your songs or even wake up to them in the mornings, instead of loud buzzers or digital alarms. For business travelers or vacationers, there are smaller versions of popular alarm clocks that are fully portable for travel. These have many of the same features as your alarm clock at home, using visual and audio technologies to make your morning as pleasant or disruptive as need be. Heavy sleepers need not worry about sleeping through their alarms anymore either. Many major manufacturers offer clocks that sound off extremely loud alarms that can wake anyone, and even come with vibrating accessories that can be used to shake you awake in bed. Alarm clocks can range in price and convenience, from the most basic to those with endless exotic features and designs. With so many types of alarm clocks to choose from, you may just find the one you need among the following lists below.
    August 26, 2013
  • Of all the things we use in our daily lives, we don't give a heck of a lot of thought to the batteries that power some of our most crucial electronics. Remote controls, camera equipment, alarm clocks are all powered by simple batteries that we don't give a second thought to until they're out of juice. Then you're stuck with a dead device and you're scrambling to find a new battery to replace it. But with a battery tester, you'll know how much power is left in any size cell that you use most often before it dies out on you. They're pretty straight-forward little units that can meter the amount of power in almost any size battery and tell you when it's time for replacement in just seconds. All you need to do is touch a contact to both ends of the battery and instantly read the level of potency on the gauge. It's that easy. The battery testers on our list have been chosen based on factors such as functionality, ease of use, types of batteries that can be tested, portability, and price.
    June 24, 2013