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Music

  • Since the first "rhythm machine" (the "Rhythmicon") was invented in 1932, people have sought out a way to overlay their music with loop-based percussion parts. While the first machines could only play a limited number of rhythms, such as mambo or tango, the modern day drum machine is loaded with thousands of preset rhythms, as well as specialized sounds to help the producer or DJ realize a finished track. Some drum machines are also samplers, allowing the user to create their own sounds and trigger them from the pads. The things to look out for in drum machines are the quality of the sound, of course, but also how easy and fun it is to use in practice. When shopping for a drum machine, questions arise such as, how responsive are the pads themselves, how intuitive is the screen interface, and what are the connectivity options in terms of a larger rig? All of the below options satisfy the core requirements of a functional drum machine, but they differentiate themselves because of the answer to those questions, as well as the quality of sound.
    March 02, 2018
  • The snare drum stand is an important piece of hardware which, as its name implies, holds the snare drum in place. A drummer’s snare drum takes a lot of abuse as it’s usually hit a bit harder than other drums, and therefore these stands needs to be of the best quality. Snare drum stands usually come in two different heights which are drum set and concert height. Drum set height stands are meant to be played from a seated position while playing drum set. Concert height stands are meant to be played while standing, often in an orchestral setting. Obviously, drummers should look for a drum set height snare drum stand if they primarily play drum set. My picks for best snare drum stand are all drum set height stands, as concert height stands have been excluded from this list.The most important feature of the snare drum stand is the design of the “basket” on top of the stand which holds the drum in place with three arms. The stands on this list have great baskets that are easily adjusted and don’t require excessive turning of the wrist. The “tilter” device is a mechanism allowing the drum angle to be adjusted and our selections all have durably constructed tilters which can be adjusted to any angle you need.These picks are also height adjustable and don’t take up a lot of room with excess parts. Sometimes you’ll have to adjust your snare drum to a variety of angles in the middle of a gig or recording session, so all of these picks feature systems for making quick and easily adjustable. The way your snare drum sounds says a lot about you as a drummer, and I have chosen stands that allow the drum to ring properly. These picks are all durable stands from the best hardware manufacturers in the industry and are made with parts which won’t fall apart on you.
    April 08, 2016
  • Digital pianos certainly aren’t a casual purchase. These instruments offer up the feel, look, sound and size as a more traditional acoustic piano, but also come with more modern features that bridge them into the 21st century. This gives buyers a best-of-both-worlds type of playing experience. These are the best digital pianos available today, with each one here manufactured with a minimum of 88 keys to give you a realistic range to make your playing experience feel authentic, they're equipped with realistic, built-in effects to help color the sound of your performance, and each offers USB connectivity for linking the piano to your computer for enhanced playing and recording options.
    February 05, 2016
  • The oboe is a double reed instrument in the woodwind family and an essential member of large ensembles such as orchestras, bands as well as smaller chamber ensembles. The oboes recommended here are all manufactured by reputable brand names, built from high quality materials to facilitate great sound production, accurate tuning and smooth key response. For more help selecting the right oboe for your needs, check out our buyer’s guide provided below.
    February 05, 2016
  • Invented by Belgium native Adolph Sax, the saxophone is classified as a woodwind instrument due to the reed situated in the mouthpiece which is used to produce sound. Today, the four most commonly played saxophones are the soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones.Since its invention in the mid-1800’s, the saxophone has become a staple in wind and small ensembles, bands, solo performances, the occasional orchestra piece, and more. All of the saxophones featured on the following lists are manufactured by reputable brands, feature durable construction, and manufactured with quality materials which facilitate exceptional tone production and intonation. For more help selecting the best saxophone for your needs, you can check out our buyers guide below.
    February 05, 2016
  • B-flat soprano and bass clarinet are the most commonly played members of the clarinet family, finding their way into orchestras, wind ensembles, jazz bands, small ensembles and solo performance. The best overall clarinets we’ve listed here are manufactured by reputable brands, built of high-quality, industry-standard materials designed to facilitate great sound production, accurate tuning, and smooth key action. Each clarinet comes with a case, mouthpiece, ligature, at least one reed and a cleaning swab, though performers will most likely want to customize their mouthpiece setup. For more help selecting the best clarinet for your needs, check out our buyer’s guide below.
    February 03, 2016
  • A member of the woodwind family, the flute is one of the world’s oldest known musical instruments, with early examples dating back over 35,000 years. Each musician’s personal preference and experience level will be a determining factor in selecting a flute with a wide array of choices in terms of brand, metal combination and tone colors.The best flutes provided on these lists serve as a great starting point for finding a suitable instrument. They’re all produced by reputable brands using craftsman-level manufacturing techniques with each instrument built from high-quality, industry-standard materials to facilitate great sound production and accurate intonation. For more help selecting the best flute to meet your needs, check out our buyers guide listed below.
    February 03, 2016
  • The pre amplifier has been around as long as sound has been recorded. For the past 80 years, thousands of different models have been made and manufacturers have enjoyed successful business from this product.Preamps work by amplifying the signal so it can properly handle further processing. The amplification is done as close to the sensor as possible to decrease any outside noise or interference and how the signal is amplified determines the kind of sound you’ll get. Traditionally, tube preamps add their own color to the signal and solid-state preamps boost the signal while attempting to keep as much transparency as possible. These two lists comprise of the best of both worlds and any preamp discussed here will satisfy any recording situation you may have ahead of you.
    February 03, 2016
  • Because of their technological capabilities and the simple fact they’re quiet, electronic drum sets are becoming very popular. A drummer can plug in a pair of headphones and practice without disturbing neighbors or parents with a lot of noise. And with the added technological components, you’re buying not only a musical instrument but a mini-computer as well. Choosing the best electronic drum set doesn’t have to be complicated, especially after you’ve gone through our buyer’s guide provided below.
    February 02, 2016
  • Cajóns are all over the retail percussion market these days. It's to the point where competition is apparently so fierce, top manufacturers are cranking out excellent low priced models. All the finalists on this list are remarkably well balanced and diverse in sound projection and tone quality. They'll all make a great workhorse for pros or solid practice tool for beginners. The basic principle behind ranking was how close each one compares to pricier cajóns by the same leading companies. Meinl's Headliner series is clearly the best value – none come close to that kind of quality for a hundred bucks.
    February 02, 2016
  • Great skins or heads on cheap drums – okay, it may sound like a contradiction in terms, but consider this for a moment – if the issue were congas, it's of course a different story; but because bongos require a fraction of the wood or fiberglass that congas consume, the overall sound quality depends more on the skin and the player than the drum's body or even its hardware system. So again, consider the idea of not spending hundreds for upper echelon bongo drums. Instead buy a pair of the cheapies featured on this list for $100, and if the diameters match, invest in some quality hide or synthetic Remos. You should grab a mirror to check out the look of pleasant surprise that formulates on your face once you start playing! Even without high quality heads, the bongo drums here are pretty darn decent for extremely low prices.
    February 02, 2016
  • The sad fact is, many affordable conga drums are poorly made. They'll have cheap hardware that will easily strip and stock skins that aren't at all responsive, a pain to play especially if you're a beginner. The drums on this list, though, will last a long time and can take serious abuse if you're a pro who gigs a lot. The main criteria for the higher finishers was the quality of the factory-issued skins, as well as overall durability and sound quality. The top tier drums here do cost a bit more than the featured bargain models, but $300 is the "budget"-level limit.
    February 02, 2016
  • The metronome is a powerful musical teaching tool and within the last few years, the technology behind it has advanced considerably. Practice with a metronome on a regular basis is important for all musicians, but it needs to be done with the right model which will force you to think and challenge your ability to keep time. Scroll down to our metronome buyers guide for additional information to help you find the perfect model.
    February 02, 2016
  • There comes a point when budding violinists know they want to stick with this instrument for a long time, and are ready to find a violin they can call their own. Purchasing a violin can be a good investment, for although violins are some of the more expensive musical instruments, they don’t lose their value over time when treated with care. If the violin sounds good and is easy to play, owning a violin rather than renting one can be an inspiration for a young musician, encouraging them to spend more time playing the instrument. Finding such a violin can be a challenge, however, as every instrument is unique.There is no substitute for playing several violins to find the one that is right for you. If you don’t have a good violin shop in your area, some shops are willing to ship several violins to you, allowing you to try them out and keep the one you like best. A good student violin will have a pleasant sound, consistent tone quality through the entire range of notes, responsive dynamic range, and will feel easy to play. Good craftsmanship is essential - look for a solid spruce top, aged maple back and sides, ebony pegs which don’t stick or come loose, and fine tuners on an ebony tailpiece.The list below includes instruments from trusted shops which consistently receive good reviews from teachers, parents and students. They are all available as sets complete with a case and a bow for between $400 and $600. NOTE: If you order any violin from a manufacturer’s website or other online source rather than from a violin shop, take it to a professional local violin shop for setup and adjustment to ensure good tone and playability.
    February 02, 2016
  • Of any drum, the snare is the one with the most character and the main component in defining a drummer's signature sound. Most professional drummers prefer to use different drums for specific genres of music and snares are no exception. The best snare drums are versatile enough for use with multiple genres of music with the four main genre-specific categories being rock, jazz, metal, and hip-hop. We've compiled the following lists of the best genre-specific snare drums available and provided a buyer’s guide loaded with information to help you in your search.
    January 29, 2016
  • As a drummer, I think a lot about the type of shoes that I wear when playing. I played barefoot for most of my young life. While in college, I recorded a rock album with my band in a professional studio. My first time recording,  I played barefoot for the first half hour. I decided to switch to shoes when I first heard playback as my kick drum was pretty solid, but it just wasn't consistent enough. I needed every hit to be extremely powerful, and my foot just wasn't enough by itself so from that day forward I switched to wearing a pair of shoes every time I played.There are many types of shoes that are great to wear when playing drums. Most drummers want footwear that gives them some extra power without interfering with the foots natural motion while other drummers like a thin shoe that feels like a glove for the foot. Obviously, different people prefer different feels, but there are some common characteristics that most drummers look for in a pair of shoes.We chose the following best shoes for drummers because of their comfortable feel which will allow you to focus on playing consistent patterns and perform advanced techniques picks. These shoes are all extremely lightweight as well so your feet won’t be left feeling weighed down and sluggish when playing. Traction is also a very important consideration and while these picks allow for some sliding to perform doubles, but still have enough grip to keep your foot firmly in control of the pedals.
    January 19, 2016
  • The first time I thought about getting cases for my drums was before my first gig in high school and my rock band was booked to play a set at a local coffee shop. I had to bring my drum set to the venue, and that meant I needed some cases put my drums in while I drove them to the gig. Heading to the local drum shop, I was surprised at all the questions they had for me! Expecting the clerks to just to hand me a set of bags and a bill for $10, I actually had to go back home, measure my drums, determine what kind of bags/cases I needed, and finally borrow some money from my parents because my $10 budget just wasn’t going to cut it!There are two main types of protection for drums to consider. Hard cases are often called “cases” and soft cases are generally referred to as “bags”. Hard Cases are made of a molded plastic material with most hard case manufacturers offering the option of lining the inside of the case with protective foam. While expensive, it’s highly recommended for individuals seeking the most protection. Hard shell cases with foam lining offer the most protection of any case option because those without the foam lining don’t offer protection against scratching.Soft bags are made of a synthetic fabric or nylon material. They’re lined with padding and are typically a cheaper option than hard cases. Soft cases are also much lighter making them easy to move around. It’s important to choose cases that are appropriate and cost effective to the drums you are protecting. For example, I have hard shell cases with foam lining for my expensive drums and soft cases for my inexpensive drums.The best drum cases can cost you about $50-100 per case, but in most situations the price of admission is worth the initial cost. I have several snare drums that are custom built and one of a kind. If they were damaged in any way, they could not be replaced. I have had some of my cases for 20 years, and they look brand new. I have quality cases for these drums. These cases have lasted countless plane rides and 2 cross country moves.It is important to measure your drums properly before you purchase cases. It is also a good idea to talk to the company or venue about things like mounting hardware and snare strainers. Sometimes these items can determine the size of the case that is needed. The actual size and weight of a case is very important for the gigging drummer. Hard cases are going to be more bulky and heavy than soft bags.We chose the following best drum cases for the superior level of protection they provide thanks to their durable construction whether hard or soft shell, their generous sizes which can comfortably accommodate most any setup. These picks are all the lightest options available which allows for easy transportation without compromising their level of protection.
    January 08, 2016
  • The bass drum beater is the part of the bass drum pedal actually striking the head, making it an important element in determining the sound and feel of a drummer’s bass drum. All bass drum pedals come with a beater but vary greatly in design, so purchasing a new bass drum beater is a great way to change the sound and feel of your existing pedal.There are several different types of bass drum beaters. They mostly vary in the type of material that strikes the head with the most common options being felt, plastic, wood, wool, and metal. There’s also beaters available which have multiple surfaces on the same beater. These types are great because you can switch the surface during a gig with one simple turn of a drum key. You can also find beaters made out of a soft synthetic fur material and look like a beater for a concert bass drum.The material the beater striking the head is what determines the sound you hear. It’s recommended you have several bass drum beaters because you’ll need to produce a different sound for each style of music you play. For example, a felt beater is good for general playing because it’s very versatile and you may usually only want to use a plastic beater when your felt beater isn’t cutting through. While plastic beaters have a “ticky” sound, they’re a bit louder than a felt beater. A wooden beater can be used for a raw, articulate, open sound that’s ideal for simulating a concert bass drum. If you’re someone who enjoys playing loud heavy metal music, look to a metal beater for your needs.These for picks for drum best beater come available in a variety of different striking materials to suit the sound you’re looking for. They’re also all constructed to be extremely durable, meaning the surface will not wear down over years of playing with them; durability is extremely important with a felt beater because it’s the most susceptible to wear from normal use. Therefore, all of my felt picks are made with quality felt that will retain their sound over time. Lastly, these picks also all have the proper balance of size and weight to ensure consistent sound every time.It is important to note we’re only focusing on beaters intended to play the drum set bass drum. These are often called “kick drum” beaters. Concert bass drum beaters that are used in the orchestra will not be discussed in this review.
    January 07, 2016
  • A practice drum pad can be a wonderful tool in developing technique and speed while at the same time allowing a drummer to practice anywhere, and not worry about making a lot of noise. A practice pad looks like a thick drumhead that a drummer can hit to simulate the feel of playing on a real drum. Most drum companies have their signature practice pad available in multiple sizes. Usually the sizes range from 6-12 inches. The most common pad surfaces are rubber, plastic, and an actual drumhead. However, it’s important to note a practice pad is only a tool for practice and not an acceptable substitute for an actual drum. While practice pads are great for practicing stick control exercises and speed building workouts, they cannot improve sound production.Recently companies have been making practice pads with multiple surfaces to simulate the feel of playing on different types of drums; for example, snare drums feel different than tom toms and often require different techniques. Therefore, some of our picks have multiple surfaces on one side while others are double-sided with a soft surface on top and a hard surface on the bottom. Most rubber surfaces are soft and are good for speed building.It’s important to note some soft pads aren’t designed to feel like a real drum, but rather are designed to help build better technique. Hard plastic surfaces are good for simulating the feel of a marching snare drum or cymbals. The actual drumhead surface does a great job of simulating an actual drum and can often be tuned to different tensions.A drummer should have several pads for practicing different techniques. It’s preferred to have multiple surfaces on a pad so one can practice multiple techniques in a given practice session. Another hallmark of a good pad are mounting options for cymbal pad stands. I usually prefer 6 inch double-sided pads for gigging. They are small and don’t take up a lot room in my stick/hardware bag. Small pads are perfect to have for a pre gig warm-up backstage and you’ll usually want to keep larger practice pads in your studio at home.We chose these best practice drum pads for their responsive, drum-like feel aimed at helping you build better technique, they offer multiple playing surfaces to simulate different drums, and their overall durable construction ensures each pick will last you many years.
    January 07, 2016
  • The cymbal bag is perhaps the most important case a drummer can own as protecting one’s cymbals is usually the highest priority. It doesn’t take a lot to scratch a cymbal, so it is important to protect then during travel. Since most drummers spend a lot of money and time to find cymbals, protecting them adequately is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, there are many different cymbals bags to choose from on the market.The two main options of cymbal bags are soft and hard shell. The hard shell is usually referred to as a “case.” Hard shell cases are made of a hard plastic material and offer more protection. Soft cymbal bags are usually made out of leather or a synthetic material that is lighter and generally easier to carry. I own both hard cases, and soft bags. Soft cymbal bags are usually fine if you will be the only one handling your cymbals. Soft bags are usually easier to open, often only having a zipper. Hard cases usually require a strap or screw being undone, and the case being separated into two separate parts. This can be a hassle and can lead to a lot of time spent fussing with your cymbals. I find hard cases are better for touring and airline travel.Most cymbal bags/cases can accommodate cymbals as large as 22 inches, and that’s the size bag that I recommend. If you are one of the few people that have a 24 inch cymbal, then obviously you should purchase a bag that specifies it can hold a cymbal that large since some bags can only accommodate cymbals as large as 18 or 20 inches, which in my opinion are too small for normal use. If you don’t have a 24 inch cymbal, you shouldn’t buy a matching 24 inch soft cymbal bag. The extra room in a soft bag allows the cymbals to move around, and that leaves the door open for a lot of scratches and dings.A cymbal bag should also be as light as possible since they usually become extremely heavy when they’re loaded down with cymbals, so the bag itself should be as light as possible. When I first started playing gigs, I would always bring a cymbal bag with a shoulder strap which led to a lot of unnecessary pain in my shoulder when I’d be playing a gig. This is the reason that most of my picks have wheels. While some bags also have backpack style straps, I find these usually break from the continual heavy weight of the cymbals. Another helpful convenience is a front pouch for high-hats or sticks.These best cymbal bags were chosen for their durable construction which provides a superior level of protection for your cymbals, generously sized interiors sizes to accommodate most cymbals, and they’ve all been designed with features which makes them convenient to transport from one gig to another.
    January 06, 2016
  • A drum throne is a fancy name for the stool that drummers sit on while they play. After all, since you’re sitting on a throne, you should feel like a king! A good drum throne will position the player in an upright and comfortable position. The three main variables that distinguish drum thrones from each other are: seat design, height adjustment mechanism, and legs; these often change within models provided by a particular company.The most important part of the throne is the padded seat (for obvious reasons) which vary by design and the amount of cushion they provide. Ideally you’ll want to have several thrones you can use for different gigs. For example, if you have an intense rock gig, you may prefer a firm seat and vice versa a soft seat for musical theater or pops concert gigs.One common seat design is a round pad that looks similar to the top of a barstool. The other design you’re likely to see is called a bicycle seat or “tractor style”, although it’s actually much wider and more comfortable than a bicycle seat. A bicycle/tractor seat design is triangular in shape, and feels drastically different than a round top. I have thrones with both seat designs and I usually use the bicycle/tractor style for longer gigs because they’re more comfortable.The seats height adjustment mechanism is sometimes hydraulic (similar to a modern office chair) with a lever that you pull to raise and lower the seat. This mechanism adjusts the quickest but it will most likely start to fail after several years of consistent use. There’s also an extended pole design similar to a cymbal stand and other pieces of drumming hardware. This design can be difficult to adjust but it’s often the easiest to set and remain level if you have a locking bracket. Finally there’s the screw type design that spins to adjust the height. In my opinion this design often moves around slightly height-wise but is more durable overall.The last variable to account for is the number of legs on a throne. Thrones typically have three, four, or even five legs which can usually be folded so the base can be neatly packed into a hardware bag. Many thrones also have a backrest that you can purchase separately and is highly recommended if you spend a lot of time playing. One thing to note is some companies are experimenting with tilting thrones but we’re going to be focusing on the traditional design for this best list.The criteria we’ve used in choosing these best drum thrones is their level of comfort, ease of adjustment, and overall durability. Comfort is important when you spend long hours practicing and playing gigs and these picks feature the perfect amount of support and padding, both the resting position and while you’re playing.Drum thrones also need to be height adjustable for obvious reasons, and all of these picks are easily adjustable; you may find yourself plating gigs that don’t allow a lot of space to get off of your throne to adjust the height so this is a key feature to have. Lastly, each of these thrones are durably constructed because who doesn’t hate situations in which you reach to pick up your throne, and the seat separates from the base?
    January 06, 2016
  • Multitrack recording is the foundation for nearly all forms of recorded music. But what was once a process that was solely relegated to tape and immersive recording studios has now entered a world that almost exclusively occupies the digital realm, and can be done with a device that can easily sit in a car’s passenger seat. There are many different types of multitrack recorders that exist today that occupy a very wide price range, so all of the items listed here have been selected keeping in mind that individual consumers have varying budgets that they are working with. Nonetheless, here are the best multitrack recorders you can get today, with each one listed here equipped with USB connectivity, making it easy to transfer files and use the recorder with a computer, they can record multiple tracks at once which makes them great for live recordings, and lastly they contain onboard faders or knobs to give you the ability mix your audio live on the spot.
    December 16, 2015
  • The mixing board is the engineer’s map, helping him or her navigate through a session and deliver a hands-on approach to mixing, broadcasting, tracking, and producing audio. There are many different types of mixing boards that exist and they all have different purposes, but the general commonalities that they share are the inputs, outputs, and faders that correspond to either analog or digital audio sources. Mixing boards can also be used to add and send effects, tweak EQs, and more. There are many mixing boards available for those looking for their “map” in both the recording studio and in a live environment, and while many of them have a price tag that easily puts them into a price point of six figures, there are also some that are a bit more attainable to the normal individual. We've chosen these picks as the best mixing boards available today, with each one listed here featuring sends that allow you to route your audio with ease, no fewer than 10 tracks to give you a wide range of control to work with, and pan/EQ settings to give you plenty of options to manipulate sound that runs through the board.
    December 16, 2015
  • Compression and limiting may be one of the more difficult to understand concepts for those who are not as well-versed in the world of audio engineering, but those who do understand their importance recognize that these tools can truly make or break a recording. Compressors reduce a signal’s louder volume peak while boosting the quieter sounds in order to deliver a more balanced result. Limiters are similar to compressors, but perform the same function in a much more extreme way (a greater ratio of compression). While a typical compressor has a ratio of 20:1 (meaning, for instance, that for every 20 decibels that the signal goes over the threshold, the compressor only lets one through) or less, limiters have ratios that can go as high as 100:1. We've chosen these picks as the best compressor/limiters available today, with each one listed here equipped with onboard controls to adjust parameters such as attack and release, they weigh less than 20 lbs for easy transport and compact usability, and they also offers a visual cue (either LED light or VU meter) to help draw some context as to how the control is affecting the signal that runs through it.
    December 16, 2015
  • Consider the patchbay as the traffic controller in the world of audio engineering. When working with multiple outboard gear, it can get a little complicated to connect everything to your console in an orderly fashion and that’s where the patchbay comes into play. These devises route and organize what can be an extremely convoluted setup into something more streamlined and self-contained. If you’ve ever seen a picture from when telephones were first introduced and someone had to sit in a room connecting lines into ports in order to make calls happen, it’s the same concept. So needless to say, the patchbay’s role in a recording studio is of extreme importance. We've selected the best patchbays available today, with each one listed here offering at least 12 connections to link cables through, they're rack mountable for easy integration into studio or live rigs, and they also feature adjustable operating modes or configurations which allow you to calibrate each patchbay to best fit your routing needs.
    December 16, 2015
  • The direct input box (commonly referred to as the DI) plays a crucial role in delivering balanced sound in both contained recording environments as well as in more dynamic live performance settings. By taking a high impedance, unbalanced signal and converting it into a low impedance, balanced sound, the signal can be routed over long cable distance without any frequency loss. Though this may not all sound like the sexiest part of the signal flow process, its function is invaluable, as it allows the audio signal to remain intact even when traveling through long cables. We've chosen the following best DI boxes available today because they each feature a pad to protect against unwanted hot signal from overdriving through the unit, they all weigh less than two pounds making them easy to travel with, and they're also able to handle multiple types of input sources, providing versatility for musicians and engineers who need a tool that can perform several functions.
    December 10, 2015
  • There are many companies which manufacture drum sets and they each produce several different types and models. As long as you have all the necessary information, picking out a drum set can be a very fun experience. Backed by 20 years of experience, I've chosen the best drum sets in a variety of categories which will help narrow your search. Also check out our drum set buyers guide below for additional details to help you choose a kit suited to your needs.
    November 24, 2015
  • Studio monitors are loudspeakers designed typically for use within professional/home recording studios, radio stations, and television studios. Their main purpose is to give the listener a reference point for which to mix the sound. These speakers aren’t meant to give you the best sound possible but rather the clearest because if there’s something wrong with the mix, the engineer needs to hear it so it can be fixed before it hits consumer systems.  However, once a mix has been perfected, there’s no better place to listen to it than on a good pair of reference monitors.  For more information on choosing a studio monitor right for your audio needs, check out our buyer’s guide below.
    November 23, 2015
  • Do you ever plan on taking your guitar out of your house? If so, you’re going to need a gig bag. In addition to keeping your axe safe and protected from any potential damages of the outside world, a gig bag can also make traveling with your instrument exponentially easier. Picking the right option is no casual move so definitely check out our buyer’s guide below to learn all about the essentials which make for a great gig bag.
    November 23, 2015
  • When selecting a bass drum foot pedal you have three playing styles to choose from. A single bass drum pedal allows one foot to play a single bass drum, a double bass drum pedal allows use of both feet, and finally the option of two single pedals playing two separate bass drums. There are also three bass drum drive types which include the chain, strap, and direct link; take the time to try each and determine which is the most suitable for you. Beginning players should be fine with one bass drum and a single pedal but eventually they’ll want to explore double bass options as today’s drummers utilize double pedals for a variety of musical genres. Check out our buyer's guide below for more details on choosing a bass drum pedal best suited for you.
    November 23, 2015